Apollo & Dionysus

Masculine and Feminine
Gay and Straight
Academic and Animal
Dominant and Submissive
Old sensibilities with
Young Insecurities
Subject and Object
All at once

It took Khufu twenty-three years to build his Great Pyramid at Giza, where some eleven hundred stone blocks, each weighing about two and a half tons, had to be quarried, moved, and set in place every day during the annual building season, roughly four months long. Few commentators on these facts can resist noting that this achievement is an amazing testimonial to the pharaoh’s iron control over the workers of Egypt. I submit, on the contrary, that pharaoh Khufu needed to exercise no more control over his workers at Giza than pharaoh Bill Gates exercises over his workers at Microsoft. I submit that Egyptian workers, relatively speaking, got as much out of building Khufu’s pyramid as Microsoft workers will get out of building Bill Gates’s pyramid (which will surely dwarf Khufu’s a hundred times over, though it will not, of course, be built of stone).

No special control is needed to make people into pyramid builders—if they see themselves as having no choice but to build pyramids. They’ll build whatever they’re told to build, whether it’s pyramids, parking garages, or computer programs.

Karl Marx recognized that workers without a choice are workers in chains. But his idea of breaking chains was for us to depose the pharaohs and then build the pyramids for ourselves, as if building pyramids is something we just can’t stop doing, we love it so much.

— ― Daniel Quinn, Beyond Civilization: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure (via lifting-of-the-veil)

Right now our food race is rapidly converting our planet’s biomass into human mass. This is what happens when we clear a piece of land of wildlife and replant it with human crops. This land was supporting a biomass comprising hundreds of thousands of species and tens of millions of individuals.

Now all the productivity of that land is being turned into human mass, literally into human flesh. Every day all over the world diversity is disappearing as more and more of our planet’s biomass is being turned into human mass. This is what the food race is about. This is exactly what the food race is about: every year turning more of our planet’s biomass into human mass.

The arms race could only be ended in two ways, either by a nuclear catastrophe or by the participants walking away from it. Luckily the second of these happened. The Soviets called it quits - and there was no catastrophe.

The race between food and population is the same. It can be ended by catastrophe, when simply too much of our planet’s biomass is tied up in humans, and fundamental ecological systems collapse, but it doesn’t have to end that way. It can end the way the arms race ended, by people simply walking away from it. We can say, “We understand now that there can be no final triumph of food over population.

This is because every single win made on the side of food is answered by a win on the side of population. It has to be that way, it always has been that way, and we can see that it’s never going to stop being that way.”

— Daniel Quinn, Beyond Civilization (via lifting-of-the-veil)

“Because revolution in our culture has always represented an attack on hierarchy, it has always meant upheaval - literally a heaving up from below. But upheaval has no role to play in moving beyond civilization. If the plane is in trouble, you don’t shoot the pilot, you grab a parachute and jump. To overthrow the hierarchy is pointless; we just want to leave it behind.”

— Daniel Quinn, Beyond Civilization (via lifting-of-the-veil)
kierangosney:

A guy down on his luck in Manhattan. My attempt at something D’Agata-esque and more expressionistic than usual. A castaway in the sea was going down for the third time when he caught sight of a passing ship. Gathering his last strength, he waved frantically and called for help. Someone on board peered at him scornfully and shouted back, “Get a boat!” ― Daniel Quinn, Beyond Civilization: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure

kierangosney:

A guy down on his luck in Manhattan. My attempt at something D’Agata-esque and more expressionistic than usual. 

A castaway in the sea was going down for the third time when he caught sight of a passing ship. Gathering his last strength, he waved frantically and called for help. Someone on board peered at him scornfully and shouted back, “Get a boat!” 

― Daniel QuinnBeyond Civilization: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure

fuckyeahmoleskines:

the red book : entry 54 - pen Moleskine entry
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dominic-Damien/241055724413?ref=hl
humansofnewyork:

"I’ve got one of those bucket lists. I want to drive a race car. I wanted to join the Air Force, but that was just so I could jump out of an airplane, with a parachute— but not from too high though. Just medium high. I also want to go up in a balloon, because that looks fun. And also I want to do that thing where you’re holding onto that kite-looking-thing while it goes through the air. Then I want to catch one of those big fish with the thing coming out of its nose, where they have to strap you to a chair so you can reel it in. My friend says I’m too old for that, but I think I can do it."

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve got one of those bucket lists. I want to drive a race car. I wanted to join the Air Force, but that was just so I could jump out of an airplane, with a parachute— but not from too high though. Just medium high. I also want to go up in a balloon, because that looks fun. And also I want to do that thing where you’re holding onto that kite-looking-thing while it goes through the air. Then I want to catch one of those big fish with the thing coming out of its nose, where they have to strap you to a chair so you can reel it in. My friend says I’m too old for that, but I think I can do it."

I have to accept that Eros and Aphrodite consider me as a lost cause.

poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.

Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation

This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others

This is a child born right next to that culture

Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do

Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.

So apparently cultural exchange is a bad thing…

So apparently cultural exchange is a bad thing…